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COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE LOANS GARDEN GROVE CA
COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES GARDEN GROVE CA
GARDEN GROVE CALIFORNA
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FREE LOAN ANALYSIS

We Do Great Commercial Lending!
"Commercial Real Estate
LOANS IN GARDEN GROVE CA"

We Secure Financing Via SBA Loans, Commercial Real Estate Loans and C&I Loans. PREFERRED PROPERTY TYPES ARE OFFICE, INDUSTRIAL, RETAIL, MULTIFAMILY, MEDICAL AND SPECIAL PURPOSE

PURCHASE AND REFINANCING OPTIONS:
UP TO 10 YEARS FIXED RATE AND 30 YEAR AMORTIZATION

Thank you for your interest in our commercial real estate and small business lending products. Our loan officers have extensive experience in business development, finance, credit administration, policy writing, underwriting, special assets-commercial loan workouts, risk management and research & development. Our primary goal is to make sure that clients are 100% satisfied with the products and services that are delivered. We want our clients to have access to the most competitive rates and terms so that it achieves their financial goals.

The ideal client is a real estate investor or business owner who is in need of financing for the following reasons: purchase or refinance commercial real estate, equipment & machinery acquisition, working capital, business acquisition and debt refinance.    

When it’s time to make important real estate or financial decisions for your company we know that it can be stressful, complicated, expensive and overwhelming. Our mission is to make the financing process relatively painless, simple, cost effective and even enjoyable.

Common Commercial Real Estate (CCRE) originates commercial real estate and small business loans for investors and small business owners throughout California as well as nationwide. We provide investors and small business owners access to the most competitive financing through prominent national & regional banks, credit unions and private lenders.

For commercial real estate loans we can secure financing for purchases and refinances of existing loans up to $15,000,000. We will provide competitive loan products for a full range of properties, including apartments, retail/shopping centers, office, industrial, single-tenant net lease, medical and special purpose. Fixed interest rates are offered at the periods of 3 years, 5 years, 7 years and 10 years. Depending on the property type, loans can be amortized for up to 30 years. Some of the lenders that we work with offer low origination fees and no pre-payment penalties.

For small business owners, CCRE can secure revolving lines of credit (secured & unsecured) from $50,000 up to $2,000,000; equipment term loans up to $1,500,000; fixed rate commercial real estate loans up to $15,000,000; and SBA loans up to $5,000,000.

Is a commercial loan right for you?

*Commercial Loan Uses

Commercial Real Estate Purchase Commercial Real Estate Refinance
1031 Exchange
Business Acquisition
Business Expansion
Purchase Equipment
Lines of Credit
Long-Term Working Capital
Debt Refinance

WE MAKE LOANS ON PROPERTIES INCLUDING:

Retail
Apartments
Factories / Industrial
Shopping Centers
Office Buildings
Warehouses
Industrial
Mixed-Use / Single Use
Owner Occupied
Medical

Call Us Today (949) 354-2485

ABOUT COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES
COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES GARDEN GROVE CA
GARDEN GROVE CALIFORNA

A commercial mortgage is a mortgage loan secured by commercial property, such as an office building, shopping center, industrial warehouse, or apartment complex. The proceeds from a commercial mortgage are typically used to acquire, refinance, or redevelop commercial property.

Commercial mortgages are structured to meet the needs of the borrower and the lender. Key terms include the loan amount (sometimes referred to as "loan proceeds"), interest rate, term (sometimes referred to as the "maturity"), amortization schedule, and prepayment flexibility. Commercial mortgages are generally subject to extensive underwriting and due diligence prior to closing. The lender's underwriting process may include a financial review of the property and the property owner (or "sponsor"), as well as commissioning and review of various third-party reports, such as an appraisal.

There were $3.1 trillion of commercial and multifamily mortgages outstanding in the U.S. as of June 30, 2013. Of these mortgages, approximately 49% were held by banks, 18% were held by asset-backed trusts (issuers of CMBS), 12% were held by government-sponsored enterprises and Agency and GSE-backed mortgage pools, and 10% were held by life insurance companies.

Terms

Loan amount

The loan amount of a commercial mortgage is generally determined based on loan to value (LTV) and debt service coverage ratios, more fully discussed below in the section on underwriting standards.

Loan structure

Commercial mortgages can be structured as first liens or, if a greater loan amount is desired, the borrower may be able to obtain subordinate financing as well, sometimes structured as a mezzanine note or as preferred equity, which generally carries a higher interest rate.

Interest rate

Interest rates for commercial mortgages may be fixed-rate or floating rate. Fixed-rate mortgages on stabilized commercial real estate are generally priced based on a spread to swaps, with the swap spread matched to the term of the loan. Market interest rates as well as underwriting factors greatly affect the interest rate quoted on a particular piece of commercial real estate. Interest rates for commercial mortgages are usually higher than those for residential mortgages.

Fees

Many commercial mortgage lenders require an application fee or good-faith deposit, which is typically used by the lender to cover underwriting expenses such as an appraisal on the property. Commercial mortgages may also have origination or underwriting fees (paid at close as a reduction in loan proceeds) and/or exit fees (paid when the loan is repaid).

Term

The term of a commercial mortgage is generally between five and ten years for stabilized commercial properties with established cash flows (sometimes called "permanent loans"), and between one and three years for properties in transition, for example, newly opened properties or properties undergoing renovation or repositioning (sometimes called "bridge loans"). Mortgages on multifamily properties that are provided by a government-sponsored enterprise or government agency may have terms of thirty years or more. Some commercial mortgages may allow extensions if certain conditions are met, which may include payment of an extension fee. Some commercial mortgages have an "anticipated repayment date," which means that if the loan is not repaid by the anticipated repayment date, the loan is not in default.

Amortization

Commercial mortgages frequently amortize over the term of the loan, meaning the borrower pays both interest and principal over time, and the loan balance at the end of the term is less than the original loan amount. However, unlike residential mortgages, commercial mortgages generally do not fully amortize over the stated term, and therefore frequently end with a balloon payment of the remaining balance, which is often repaid by refinancing the property. Some commercial mortgages have an interest-only period at the beginning of the loan term during which time the borrower only pays interest.

Prepayment

Commercial loans vary in their prepayment terms, that is, whether or not a real estate investor is allowed to refinance the loan at will. Some portfolio lenders, such as banks and insurance companies, may allow prepayment flexibility. In contrast, for a borrower to prepay a conduit loan, the borrower will have to defease the bonds, by buying enough government bonds (treasuries) to provide the investors with the same amount of income as they would have had if the loan was still in place.

Borrower entity

A commercial mortgage is typically taken on by a special purpose entity such as a corporation or an LLC created specifically to own just the subject property, rather than by an individual or a larger business. This allows the lender to foreclose on the property in the event of default even if the borrower has gone into bankruptcy, that is, the entity is "bankruptcy remote".

Recourse

Commercial mortgages may be recourse or non-recourse. A recourse mortgage is supplemented by a general obligation of the borrower or a personal guarantee from the owner(s) of the property, which makes the debt payable in full even if foreclosure on the property does not satisfy the outstanding balance. A nonrecourse mortgage is secured only by the commercial property that serves as collateral. In an event of default, the creditor can foreclose on the property, but has no further claim against the borrower for any remaining deficiency.

If a sponsor is seeking financing on a portfolio of commercial real estate properties, rather than a single property, the sponsor may choose to take out a cross-collateralized loan, in which the all of the properties collateralize the loan.

Reserves

Lenders may require borrowers to establish reserves to fund specific items at closing, such as anticipated tenant improvement and leasing commission (TI/LC) expense, needed repair and capital expenditure expense, and interest reserves.

Underwriting

Underwriting metrics

Lenders usually require a minimum debt service coverage ratio which typically ranges from 1.1 to 1.4; the ratio is net cash flow (the income the property produces) over the debt service (mortgage payment). As an example if the owner of a shopping mall receives $300,000 per month from tenants, pays $50,000 per month in expenses, a lender will typically not give a loan that requires monthly payments above $227,273 (($300,000-$50,000)/1.1)), a 1.1 debt cover.

Lenders also look at loan to value (LTV). LTV is a mathematical calculation which expresses the amount of a mortgage as a percentage of the total appraised value. For instance, if a borrower wants $6,000,000 to purchase an office worth $10,000,000, the LTV ratio is $6,000,000/$10,000,000 or 60%. Commercial mortgage LTV's are typically between 55% and 70%, unlike residential mortgages which are typically 80% or above.

Lenders look at rents per square foot, cost per square foot and replacement cost per square foot. These metrics vary widely depending on the location and intended use of the property, but can be useful indications of the financial health of the real estate, as well as the likelihood of competitive new developments coming online.

Since the financial crisis, lenders have started to focus on a new metric, debt yield, to complement the debt service coverage ratio. Debt yield is defined as the net operating income (NOI) of a property divided by the amount of the mortgage.

Underwriting practices

Lenders typically do thorough extreme due diligence on a proposed commercial mortgage loan prior to funding the loan. Such due diligence often includes a site tour, a financial review, and due diligence on the property's sponsor and legal borrowing entity. Many lenders also commission and review third-party reports such as an appraisal, environmental report, engineering report, and background checks.

Providers of commercial mortgages

Banks

Banks, large and small, are traditional providers of commercial mortgages. According to the Federal Reserve, banks held $1.5 trillion of commercial mortgages on their books as of June 30, 2013.

Conduit lenders

Conduit lenders originate commercial mortgages and hold them as investments for a short period of time before securitizing the loans and selling CMBS secured by the underlying commercial mortgage loans. Conduit lenders include both banks and non-bank finance companies. Approximately $560 billion of commercial mortgages were held by issuers of CMBS as of June 30, 2013, according to the Federal Reserve.

Securitization of commercial mortgages in its current form began with the Resolution Trust Corporation's (or RTC's) commercial securitization program in 1992-1997. The RTC applied an approach similar to the one it had begun successfully using with residential mortgages, issuing multiple tranches of securities secured by diversified pools of commercial mortgage loans. Following the introduction of the securitization methods by the RTC, private banks began to originate loans specifically for the purpose of turning them into securities. These loans are typically structured to forbid prepayment beyond a specified amortization schedule. This makes the resultant securities more attractive to investors, because they know that the commercial mortgages will remain outstanding even if interest rates decline.

New CMBS issuance peaked in 2007 at $229 billion. Then, the subprime mortgage crisis and the resultant global financial crisis caused CMBS prices to fall dramatically, and new issuances of CMBS securities came to a virtual halt in 2008-2009. The market has begun to recover, with $12 billion in new issuance in 2010, $37 billion in new issuance in 2011, and $48 billion in new issuance in 2012.

Government agencies

Government-sponsored enterprises such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, as well as government corporations such as Ginnie Mae, are active lenders for multifamily commercial real estate (that is, apartment buildings) in the United States. Approximately $390 billion of multifamily residential mortgages were held by government-sponsored enterprises or Agency and GSE-backed mortgage pools as of June 30, 2013, representing 12% of total commercial mortgages outstanding and 43% of multifamily commercial mortgages outstanding at that time.

Insurance companies

Insurance companies are active investors in commercial mortgages, and hold approximately $325 billion of commercial mortgages as of June 30, 2013.

Mortgage brokers

Mortgage brokers do not provide commercial mortgage loans, but are often used to obtain multiple quotes from different potential lenders and to manage the financing process.

Correspondent Lenders

Correspondent Lenders do not loan their own money, but provide front end services such as origination, underwriting, and loan servicing for lenders that utilize these types of companies. The correspondent often represents lenders in a particular geographic area.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve. Z.1 Financial Accounts of the United States. Released September 25, 2013. Accessed November 5, 2013. pp. 104-105, tables L.219 and L.220.
  2. ^ FDIC. Managing the Crisis: The FDIC and RTC Experience. Chapter 16: Securitizations, pp. 417-423. Accessed December 12, 2013.
  3. ^ Commercial Mortgage Alert Market Statistics. U.S. CMBS Monthly Issuance. Click chart for backup and historical data. Accessed December 14, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Annual UK Property Transaction Statistics [PDF]. HM Revenue & Customs. 27 Jun 2014.
  5. ^ Masters, B and Hammond, E. Bank rules hit UK property developers. Financial Times. 16 Jan 2013.
  6. ^ Q4 2013 Credit Conditions Survey. Bank of England. 8 Jan 2014.
  7. ^ Financial Conduct Authority Handbook PERG 4.4.1. Accessed on 30 Apr 2015
  8. ^ What to expect when taking out a BTL mortgage. Homes 24. 15 Apr 2015
ABOUT GARDEN GROVE CA
COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES GARDEN GROVE CA
GARDEN GROVE CALIFORNA
Garden Grove, California
City
City of Garden Grove
The Christ Cathedral
Flag of Garden Grove, California
Flag
Official seal of Garden Grove, California
Seal
Official logo of Garden Grove, California
Logo
Motto: Absit Invidia (Latin)
Location in Orange County and the state of California
Location in Orange County and the state of California
Vicinity of Garden Grove
Vicinity of Garden Grove
Garden Grove is located in USA
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 33°46'44?N 117°57'37?W? / ?33.77889°N 117.96028°W? / 33.77889; -117.96028Coordinates: 33°46'44?N 117°57'37?W? / ?33.77889°N 117.96028°W? / 33.77889; -117.96028
Country  United States of America
State  California
County Orange
Founded 1874
Incorporated June 18, 1956
Government
 • Type Council-manager
 • Mayor Bao Nguyen
 • City council
  • Steve Jones (Mayor Pro Tem)
  • Phat Bui
  • Kris Beard
  • Christopher Phan
Area
 • Total 17.959 sq mi (46.513 km2)
 • Land 17.941 sq mi (46.467 km2)
 • Water 0.018 sq mi (0.046 km2)  0.10%
Elevation 89 ft (27 m)
Population (April 1, 2010)
 • Total 170,883
 • Estimate (2013) 175,140
 • Rank 5th in Orange County
25th in California
 • Density 9,500/sq mi (3,700/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 92840–92846
Area codes 657/714
FIPS code 06-29000
GNIS feature IDs 1660662, 2410568
Website www.ci.garden-grove.ca.us

Garden Grove is a city in northern Orange County in the U.S. state of California, 34 miles (55 km) south of Los Angeles. The population was 170,883 at the 2010 United States Census. State Route 22, also known as the Garden Grove Freeway, passes through the city in an east-west direction. For information on West Garden Grove, see West Garden Grove.

History

19th century

Garden Grove was founded by Alonzo Cook in 1874. A school district and Methodist church were organized that year. It remained a small rural crossroads until the arrival of the railroad in 1905. The rail connection helped the town prosper with crops of orange, walnuts, chili peppers and later strawberries.

20th century

In 1933, much of the town's central business district was destroyed by the Long Beach earthquake, and one person was killed at the high school. The post-World War II boom led to rapid development, and Garden Grove was incorporated as a city in 1956 with about 44,000 residents.

By 1960, the population had grown to 85,000; by 1970 it was 120,000. After the Fall of Saigon in 1975, there was a large influx of Vietnamese refugees settling in Garden Grove, especially in the late 1970s and throughout the 80s, forming a large percentage of Asians in the city.

Strawberry Festival

An annual event held over Memorial Day weekend, the Garden Grove Strawberry Festival is one of the largest community festivals in the western United States, attracting an estimated 250,000 visitors. It began in 1958 and celebrates the city's agricultural past, which includes cultivating crops such as chili peppers, oranges, walnuts and strawberries. Part of the festivities include the cutting of the world's largest strawberry shortcake, carnival rides and vendors and a celebrity-filled parade. Numerous Garden Grove organizations, including the Miss Garden Grove Scholarship Program, are part of the Memorial Day weekend festivities every year. In commemoration of Garden Grove's 50th anniversary, the city painted some of its fire hydrants with a design that featured a strawberry, recognizing the festival as a big part of Garden Grove's history.l

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 46.5 km2 (18.0 sq mi) 0.10% of which is water. West Garden Grove is west of Beach Boulevard.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 84,238 —
1970 121,155 43.8%
1980 123,307 1.8%
1990 143,050 16.0%
2000 165,196 15.5%
2010 170,883 3.4%
Est. 2015 175,393 2.6%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010

The 2010 United States Census reported that Garden Grove had a population of 170,883. The population density was 9,515.3 people per square mile (3,673.9/km²). The racial makeup of Garden Grove was 68,149 (39.9%) White, 2,155 (1.3%) Black, 983 (0.6%) Native American, 63,451 (37.1%) Asian, 1,110 (0.6%) Pacific Islander, 28,916 (16.9%) from other races, and 6,119 (3.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 63,079 persons (36.9%). Non-Hispanic Whites were 22.6% of the population, down from 90.6% in 1970. Vietnamese Americans numbered 47,331 of the population. At 27.7% this was the highest concentration of any city in the U.S. except for neighboring Westminster.

The Census reported that 168,942 people (98.9% of the population) lived in households, 1,234 (0.7%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 707 (0.4%) were institutionalized.

There were 46,037 households, out of which 21,361 (46.4%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 26,659 (57.9%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 6,866 (14.9%) had a female householder with no husband present, 3,588 (7.8%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 2,025 (4.4%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 269 (0.6%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 6,491 households (14.1%) were made up of individuals and 2,842 (6.2%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.67. There were 37,113 families (80.6% of all households); the average family size was 3.94.

The population was spread out with 43,763 people (25.6%) under the age of 18, 17,383 people (10.2%) aged 18 to 24, 49,105 people (28.7%) aged 25 to 44, 42,106 people (24.6%) aged 45 to 64, and 18,526 people (10.8%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.6 years. For every 100 females there were 99.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 7.7 males.

There were 47,755 housing units at an average density of 2,659.1 per square mile (1,026.7/km²), of which 26,240 (57.0%) were owner-occupied, and 19,797 (43.0%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.2%; the rental vacancy rate was 4.6%. 96,308 people (56.4% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 72,634 people (42.5%) lived in rental housing units.

According to the 2010 United States Census, Garden Grove had a median household income of $59,988, with 15.5% of the population living below the federal poverty line.

Government

Local government

Garden Grove uses a council-manager form of government. The city council consists of mayor Bao Nguyen, mayor pro tem Steve Jones, Phat Bui, Kris Beard, and Christopher Phan. According to the city's most recent Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the city's various funds had $206.0 million in Revenues, $193.0 million in expenditures, $1,098.9 million in total a ssets, $251.5 million in total liabilities, and $196.3 million in cash and investments. The structure of the management and coordination of city services is:.

The following list is current as of February 2016.

City Department Director
City Manager Scott Stiles
Deputy City Manager Maria Stipe
City Attorney Omar Sandoval
Fire Chief Tom Schultz
Community Development Director Susan Emery
Information Technology Director Charles Kalil
Community Services Director Kim Huy
Human Resources Director Laura J. Stover
Police Chief Todd Elgin
Finance Director Kingsley C. Okereke
Public Works Director Bill Murray

Politics

Of the 63,190 registered voters in Garden Grove; 35.1% are Republicans and 36.8% are Democrats. The remaining 24.2% either declined to state political affiliation or are registered with one of the many smaller political parties.

Emergency services

Fire protection in Garden Grove is provided by the Garden Grove Fire Department with ambulance transport by Care Ambulance Service. The Garden Grove Police Department provides law enforcement with mutual aid assistance offered at times by the Anaheim Police Department's helicopter, and the Orange County Sheriff's Department Air Unit.

State and federal representation

In the California State Senate, Garden Grove is in the 34th Senate District, represented by Republican Janet Nguyen.

In the California State Assembly, Garden Grove is split between the the 65th Assembly District, represented by Republican Young Kim, the 69th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Tom Daly, and the 72nd Assembly District, represented by Republican Travis Allen.

In the United States House of Representatives, Garden Grove is split between California's 46th, 47th, and 48th congressional districts, which are represented by Loretta Sanchez (D–Santa Ana), Alan Lowenthal (D–Long Beach), and Dana Rohrabacher (R–Costa Mesa) respectively.

Economy

According to the City's 2015 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of employees
1 Air Industries Corp. 681
2 American Apparel Knit & Dye 535
3 Prime Healthcare Services 516
4 Walmart 412
5 Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics 363
6 Office Max Inc. 360
7 Hyatt Regency Orange County 350
8 GKN Aerospace Transparency Systems, Inc. 335
9 Kaiser Foundation Health 317
10 NBTY Acquisition, LLC 298

Education

The Garden Grove Unified School District serves most of the city.

Portions are assigned to Westminster School District, and Huntington Beach Union High School District.

Arts and culture

Garden Grove is home to two stage theaters, the Gem Theater and the Festival Amphitheater. The Festival Amphitheater hosts Shakespeare Orange County, which presents an annual Shakespeare Festival each summer. Both venues are owned by the City of Garden Grove, but operated by outside entities. The Gem Theater is currently operated by Damien Lorton and Nicole Cassesso of 'One More Productions'. The Festival Amphitheater is managed by Thomas Bradac, the producing artistic director of Shakespeare Orange County.

The Garden Grove Playhouse used to be an active theatre, now closed down. It was operated by a non-profit group of the same name.

Notable people

Entertainment

Sports

Politics

  • Jim Silva - former California Assemblyman, former Member of the Orange County Board of Supervisors, former Mayor of Seal Beach
  • Bill Thomas - Retired U.S. Congressman and former Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee (and alumnus of Garden Grove High School)
  • Robert K. Dornan- Former U.S. Congressman
  • Janet Nguyen - Orange County supervisor
  • Loretta Sanchez - U.S. Congresswoman
  • Curt Pringle - Former State Assemblyman, Speaker of the Assembly and former Mayor of Anaheim

Others

References

  1. ^ "City of Garden Grove". City of Garden Grove. Retrieved November 20, 2014. 
  2. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date" (Word). California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Retrieved August 25, 2014. 
  3. ^ "2010 Census U.S. Gazetteer Files – Places – California". United States Census Bureau. 
  4. ^ "Garden Grove". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 19, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b "Garden Grove (city) QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 19, 2015. 
  6. ^ "ZIP Code(tm) Lookup". United States Postal Service. Retrieved December 6, 2014. 
  7. ^ http://www.ci.garden-grove.ca.us/welcome
  8. ^ Bharath, Deepa (May 27, 2010). "Strawberry Festival kicks off today". The Orange County Register. Retrieved June 1, 2010. 
  9. ^ "About us". Garden Grove Strawberry Festival website. Retrieved June 1, 2010. 
  10. ^ Garden Grove Strawberry Festival- EVENTS Retrieved 2011-04-20
  11. ^ "Turning Golden". Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Showing off fire hydrants painted to note the city's 50th anniversary". Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  14. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  15. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Garden Grove city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Garden Grove (city), California". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. 
  17. ^ "Race and Hispanic Origin for Selected Cities and Other Places: Earliest Census to 1990". U.S. Census Bureau. 
  18. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0629000.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  19. ^ "Garden Grove City Council". City of Garden Grove. Retrieved December 14, 2014. 
  20. ^ "Mayor Pro Tem Steve Jones". Retrieved March 12, 2016. 
  21. ^ a b City of Garden Grove CAFR Retrieved 2009-08-14
  22. ^ "Garden Grove Department Directors". City of Garden Grove. Retrieved February 20, 2016. 
  23. ^ "Statewide Database". UC Regents. Retrieved November 24, 2014. 
  24. ^ "Communities of Interest - City". California Citizens Redistricting Commission. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  25. ^ "Communities of Interest - City". California Citizens Redistricting Commission. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  26. ^ City of Garden Grove CAFR
  27. ^ "About Us." Westminster School District. Retrieved on June 25, 2015.
  28. ^ "About Us." Huntington Beach Union High School District. Retrieved on June 25, 2015.
  29. ^ "The Kids Aren't Alright by The Offspring". Retrieved August 31, 2010. 
  30. ^ "Retail religion". The Economist. April 9, 2015. Retrieved April 13, 2015. 

External links

 

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